Tag Archives: Life

Heroes Crying.

An institution that should always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corrupton, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty.

–Joseph Pulitzer, May 10, 1883, in an editorial upon becoming publisher of the New York World (reproduced on a bronze plaque on the Times Tower, New York City)

Delving into my 3rd publication about Hunter S. Thompson, I continue to find shocking similarities, but more of whom I replicate on the inside than the outburst of pure insanity. I have not the courage nor the ability to articulate transparency of thoughts, like Mr. Thompson, a brilliant rogue, observing beatniks and blasting political servants.

And if I’m ever to be worth anything I honestly think it will have to be in the realm of fiction (which is) the only way I can live with my imagination, point of view, instincts, and all those other intangilbes that make people nervous in my journalism.–HS Thompson

Elders may relate more to the death of Elvis Presley (1935 – 1977), and some, more jagged in culture, Jimmy Hendrix (1942 – 1970.) I can relate, but only because of my deep roots, in Memphis, Tennessee, do I somewhat understand Elvis. And my home, in upper Fernwood, Topanga Canyon, viewed horizontally, across the gorge, framing Jimmy Hendrix home, on the ‘hot side’ of the Santa Monica Range. From the locals, I’d listen to, peers of Elvis and Hendrix, tell stories of their brilliance, blowing my mind.

But my generation, Gen X, the icon is Kurt Donald Cobain (1967 – 1994.) He defined our generation with legendary acoustic performances, sharing what many of us felt, on the inside, but didn’t know how to get it out. Only through music, his music.

Many of us are not sure exactly why, but when Phillip Seymour Hoffman died, a part of us died with him.

a part of me died

Relating to a multitude of his characters, intimacy reigned supreme, both light and dark.

So many of us affected by suicide, a climatic life event that’s not only disappointing but also humbling to the point of pondering why wasn’t I enough to live for.

travel (ck backpack spain)Charles Kochel writes. Sometimes found wandering the Ozark Mountain streams.

A novice mandolin rookie, but learning just the same. A terrible gardener continuing to try his best to grow healthy food for his family.

His moderate fly fishing skills he considers asana, but only he makes much sense of it, and this is ok.

Mindfulness is sanity.

 

Advertisements

Do No Harm

Mindful Wealth is about putting your whole heart, mind and soul into everything you do, including your financial resources. Too many times have we heard, you can’t serve two masters, in the case of wealth management, you can – investing for profit and making a positive impact in society.

It’s time we all take a look at our portfolios and make sure they are aligned with what matters most in our life. If you’re new to the term “impact investing”, it is a bit overwhelming. The alphabet soup of ESG, SRI … they go on and on.

logo

To educate further on impact investing, we need to clarify some myths.

  1. Impact Investing earns lower returns – The reality is the US core sustainable portfolio outperformed the Russell 3000 over a 5 year period, ending March 31, 2015 by nearly 30 basis points.
  2. There are limited investment options – In 1995, impact investing had only about 100 funds representing about $500 million. 2014, over 900 funds representing over $6.5 Trillion.
  3. Impact Investing is fringe and uncrowded – Many of the largest, most mindful institutions, companies and money managers have adopted the principles of Impact Investing.
  4. There’s one way to do impact investing – Engage investors to learn what matters most to them. Divest your portfolio, until it does no harm and invest to make a difference … it’s this easy.
  5. Your investing and Philanthropy should be kept separate – A portfolio that does not harm and makes a positive impact on society has an expected return par to a portfolio for financial return only.

The notion that what makes a good fiduciary investment and what makes a good societal investment are distinctly different, are just not correct.  ~Tim Schmidt, CIO, Prudential Insurance

We help foundations and families align their financial resources to what matters most, their mission in life. For more information about how to get started investing and doing good, contact our team at Yield Wealth. info@yieldwealth.com. http://www.yieldwealth.com.

It’s time to make the world a better place. Let’s cut harm from our investments and focus on making a positive impact on society.

Charles KochelCharles Kochel founded Yield Wealth Management to help foundations and families align their financial resources with what matters most.

Yield Wealth is one of the first benefit corporations in Arkansas and one of the first pure impact investing companies in the south. This blog is meant for information purposes only. Do not take this as investment advice. For more information about impact investing or how to align your financial resources to what matters most to you, contact us at info@yieldwealth.com

ALL ABOUT IMPACT

Charles KochelThe night of Sunday, September 14, 2008, I sat, legs swinging over the Hudson River on the Jersey side, staring across the river at the space where the twin towers once stood. Just to the right, employees of Lehman Brothers were walking into a tall building empty-handed, only a few minutes later to reappear with a small box of personal belongings. At this moment, I realized there was more to life than money.”

Most foundations and charitable families have a mission guiding their grant giving, but not their investing. As a result, many are shocked to learn that they own companies and bonds that are actually working at cross-purposes to the stated mission.

make a difference motivational phrase handwritten with white chalk on blackboard
INVEST AND DO GOOD

Impact Investing – Investments made in companies, organizations, and funds with the intention to generate measurable social and environmental impact and a financial return.

Impact Investing, summed up in four words…Invest and Do Good. Ultimately, impact investing is a tool for generating financial return by connecting investors to issues they care most about.

For many years, philanthropy and investing were separate disciplines—one championing social change, the other financial gain. The idea that the two approaches could be integrated in the same deals—in essence, delivering a financial return while doing good—struck most philanthropists and most investors as far-fetched. Not anymore. Impact investing, which seeks to generate social and environmental benefits while delivering a financial return, is growing in popularity.

We believe, a mindset to invest and do good will create significant wealth and enjoyed by investors in organizations that generate rather than consume, that respect human rights and nature’s limitations, and that aim to create benefit for the greatest number of stakeholders, not just shareholders. We want to help foundations and charitable families identify what matters most to them, and align their financial resources toward those outcomes.
logo

Yield Wealth Management helps foundations and charitable families align their financial resources with what matters most, their mission in life.

This blog represents opinions. Do not take as investment advice. For more information about Yield Wealth or to schedule a conversation, email info@yieldwealth.com