Tag Archives: listen without expectations

Broken, but not dead

Struggling, resisting wiping the first tear escaping my soul for decades, I restrain. She’s so pure. Too real. Pain escaping like nuclear fission of the atom bomb. I am not bent, I’m broken.

Broken is broken. There is no one more than another. You can be bent to extraordinary measures of pain, but this does not change you. Once broken, things will never be put back together the same way. Everything is different.

Humbleness crushes individualism and ego. Silent senses of others like you are comforting. I’m more careful than I once was because I’m afraid. I don’t want to break again. I will, quite sure of this. Lifestyles of the chosen: roads less traveled, blazing paths, territory owned by risk and reward.

Whilst others have faith they know for sure their roadmap from God, we peek around dark corners to see what is real and what is not. Sometimes not seeing our feet, blinded by the chaos of life’s thickets and thorns. Nothing less than a fence protecting us from a jagged cliff. One of us is sure to slip and fall, breaking yet again and again.

See your sister curled in a fetal position, at the bottom, in the valley of rising water, and without thought jump. Because once you’ve been there, you already know, they need not be alone.

Listening carefully and speaking with care is priority over who’s right and who is not. Simplicity and free time are valued more than bigger and faster. Circles shrink. The world has clarity and is good. You can see the fog snaking through the canyon, more stars fall from the sky and the flowers and the children, wow, they are so delicate. The moon is more important, as are others.

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There is only one thing I know for sure, I know nothing at all. A great poet once said, “Life ain’t easy” only followed by another living more in the present, “Today was a good day.”

travel (ck backpack spain)Charles Kochel fly-fishes. Currently exploring the Ozark Mountains, he enjoys laughing, baseball, good food, and mindful people.

He writes, tries to pick mandolin and purchased a pair of running shoes today.

Sometimes he can be found wandering the streets and paths of Northwest Arkansas, sometimes he can’t be found at all. Carpe’ Diem, may be your only chance.

 

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Wall Street’s Sharknado

The Story: If you’ve seen the movie, “The Big Short” that’s me (Brad Pitt – I wish, or maybe a hybrid of Pitt and Steve Carol.) Point is, I was at the epicenter of the collapse, feet on the ground, in Manhattan, on Wall Street – the day it all went down.

Mass chaos doesn’t do justice to describing the “Eye Wall” (pun intended) of this killer economic hurricane. It was sharknato.

sharknado

My story is rich with fear and greed, corporate corruption, big time attorneys, Wall Street, Main Street, from the highs of Heaven to the lows of Hades.

After pouring my young heart and soul into helping people, to the best of my ability, I realized the corruptness of mega-corporations. Understanding the only true purpose of a corporation, by definition is to build shareholder wealth. “At all cost” should be copied and pasted into Webster’s or Wikipedia (wait, I can do this myself.) Short term visionaries are responsible for ‘making the quarter’ and without regard to anything else, a plan is put in place to do just this. During the financial Sharknado of 2008, this left individuals, families and even the null soul of corporations devastated, it changed the people we are.

This leads me to allow anger and pain between me and the corporation. “Let it pass through.” I tell myself, it’s a mute point, null because the corporation does not care, it does not know how to feel – a corporation is an entity. It also helped me realize shrinking my circles was a good thing. The “Circle of Trust”, like Robert De Niro so eloquently described in the movie, “Meet the Parents” was immediately roped, with barbed wire, electric fences and super k-9’s named Cujo.

Some hid under their desk, whilst the storm passed and a few years later, peeked around to assess the damage. What they saw were clients crushed because half their life-saving disappeared. Retirement dreams shattered, homes up for sale, relationships severed, nervous breakdowns and even suicide was the aftermath. An economic storm that left a wake of broken people, confused, lost and knowing not, what to do next.

The Reality: Fortunately, we the people will win the war, but the toll of battles fought, between Daniel (Main Street) and Goliath (Wall Street), left our spirits broken, our minds and body tired and our bank account empty. No one ever really wins a war.

No one ever really wins a war.

The Outcome: The crucial blow, taking up to 5 years, or longer regain composure, left us alone and somewhat scared.

So, it’s time to evaluate the man in the mirror. If you don’t like what you see, make a decision to change life’s intention, from “More, Bigger, Faster” to “Leaving a legacy of positive impact, on others and the world.”

Re-organize life, a continuing process, and live simply. Create a workable plan to do more of what you love, improving quality of life, and work towards your legacy. Continue to “Fill the bucket” with dreams. Surround yourself with good people. Once this is done, there is no mountain too great to climb.

The journey starts not with having new vistas, but with having new eyes. ~Marcel Proust

 

cropped-ck-photo.jpgCharles Kochel founded Yield Wealth Management, helping people align their financial resources with what matters most to them. Yield Wealth is the first benefit corporation in Arkansas.

Charles also serves a non-profit, helping people of all ages reach their full potential. If you’d like to learn more about Yield Wealth, and how you might benefit from ‘mindful wealth management’ visit our website, http://www.yieldwealth.com.

Contact: charles@yieldwealth.com

Finding Yeshe’

Alone, writing in my journal, my server met me with gentle eyes, speaking with a servant’s heart.  Connecting immediately and having moments of deep conversation.

Leaving, he follows me outside and asks, “What are you doing in town?” We talk about mutual friends, the nearby, self sustaining, Circle Yoga Shala, where I was staying the night, and then, he invites me to the next days sweat lodge. As I start to leave, he said, “They’ll know me as Yeshe’.” and that was it.

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The next day, I find a Monk in maroon and yellow wraps, chopping wood. Beads of sweat rolling down the sides of his face, focussing entirely on the task at hand. This is Yeshe’. Whether washing windows, dishes, chopping wood or in deep conversation,Yeshe’ is always in the present moment.

After a long, hot sweat lodge, a joyful potluck with friends and a few tears shed from the opening of chakras (or just plain sweating out every thing I am), we sat atop the back porch of Circle Yoga Shala’s barn studio watching the sun set beneath Mt. Shiloh. Respecting one another’s presence, Yeshe’, a Buddhist Monk, and me, a corporate impact advisor, helping one another manifest a dream of what matters most to us.

I ask him about his understanding of wealth. He says, “Wealth is more than just how much money you have. Money is purchasing power. Wealth comes from your own definition of inner values. The sum of your talents, creativity, dreams and fears. It is all the qualities that are uniquely yours and make you happy – therefore, determining quality of life.”

As with all my clients, I ask, “What matters most to you?” He took a deep breath, in through his nostrils and exhaled our his mouth. “Understanding who I am, what I want and what I need. Until I know this, I’m just spinning wheels of life.”

Yeshe’, knowing how to “just be”, was still and deep in thought. He listens carefully to me and everything making up his being – inside and out – taking it all in. His breaths rhythmic and slow, choosing his words with care, he says, “To be wealthy and free, I need scarcity.”

Despite my 15 years having conversations about wealth and impact, there are some stratospheres I just can’t fathom. Unlike most Americans and people around the world, Yeshe’s definition of wealth is like nothing I’d ever heard. Instead of building assets to become financially free, and making a positive impact on others and the world, he wanted to give away all his worldly possessions and retreat to the mountain top of his Buddhist Monastery, in silence, for three years. His own definition of wealth and freedom.

cowboy and monk

We talk for hours, me, learning more about Yeshe’ and he about me – and how we’ve become a product of the environment we created – our past, education, trials, tribulations, fears and dreams. We embrace and part ways with a clear understanding. A respect of where each individual is now, and where we want to be in the future and set a time and medium to follow-up on the next steps of how to create a “road map” of sorts, to get from point ‘A’ to point ‘B’.

The goal is to Minimize chaos, focus on what matters most and do more of what you love. The process is to prioritize what matters most. organize your resources and align them with what matters most. Most of all, simplify, an easily understood and doable process and plan to enjoy life.

Throughout the next year, Yeshe’ and I would communicate, update one another on where we are in our plan, ask questions, voice concerns and basically leverage one another as a sounding board and creative think tank.

Exactly one year later, February 2015, we met again, at Circle Yoga Shala. After the sweat lodge and potluck with friends, we sat inside the barn studio and filmed a conversation about manifesting our dreams. It was beautiful. Yeshe’ is beautiful.

Planning for Yeshe

The next day my family, wife and two daughters, met him at his Monastery. He showed us the sacred grounds, nestled deep in the Ozark Mountains near the Little Buffalo River. We prayed, feasted, and thanked God for the opportunity for Yeshe’ to spend three years in prayer for others.

Thank you,Yeshe,’ for reminding me of my true wealth, which is independent of how much money I have. Thank you for helping me realize the suffering on monotony and the beauty of diversity. Thank you, Yeshe’ for helping me realize who I am and what makes me happy.

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CHARLES KOCHEL lives in the Arkansas Ozarks. He serves a non-profit, helping people through therapy, education and support reach their full potential.

Charles owns Yield Wealth Management, the first Benefit Corporation, Motif Advisor and pure impact advisor in Arkansas. Learn more at http://www.yieldwealth.com or contact Charles at charles@yieldwealth.com.